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Bomber and fighter jet crashed during a Dallas air show – 6 killed

DALLAS, the Texas City — During an air display in Dallas, two ancient military jets collided and then fell into the earth in a ball of flames, resulting in the deaths of six individuals, according to the officials.

Officials from various national transportation agencies were looking into what caused the crash that occurred on Saturday involving a fighter plane and a bomber plane from the second world war. The incident occurred three years after the crash of a bomber in Connecticut, which resulted in the deaths of seven people, and in the midst of persistent concerns regarding the safety of air shows that use older military aircraft. In its more than 60 years of existence, the aviation firm that owns the planes that were participating in the Wings Over Dallas display has been involved in multiple accidents.

The Dallas Executive Airport is around 16 kilometers (10 miles) from the central business district of the city, and rescue workers rushed to get there as quickly as possible. A grassy area inside the airport’s perimeter had the crumpled remains of one of the airplanes that had crashed there.

According to a tweet sent out by Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins on Sunday, the county medical examiner reported that the accident resulted in the deaths of six people. He stated that efforts by the authorities to determine the identities of the victims are ongoing. It was unclear whether there were any injuries or fatalities on the ground. It was possible that there were both. The Dallas Morning News was informed by Dallas Fire-Rescue that there were no reports of injuries at the scene.

Anthony Montoya witnessed the two planes coming together and crashing.

“I did nothing but stand there. I was very taken aback and couldn’t believe what I was hearing, “remarked Montoya, who is 27 years old and was at the air show with a buddy. “Everyone in the vicinity was choking up. Everyone suddenly started sobbing uncontrollably. Everyone was taken aback by the news.”

Victoria Yeager, the widow of the well-known Air Force test pilot Chuck Yeager and also a pilot in her own right, was also present at the exhibition. She was not present at the time of the collision, but she did observe the smoldering wreckage.

Yeager, who is 64 years old and resides in Fort Worth, stated that “it was pulverized.” “We were simply keeping our fingers crossed that they had all managed to escape, but we knew they hadn’t.”

According to statements made by Dallas Mayor Eric Johnson, the National Transportation Safety Board has assumed charge of the accident scene, and local police and fire departments are providing support. According to the officials, the investigation was going to be carried out by the Federal Aviation Administration as well. The FAA said in a statement that the collision and subsequent crash occurred at approximately 1:20 p.m.

Hank Coates, president of Commemorative Air Force, the business that owns the planes and put on the air show, stated that one of the aircraft, a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber, generally has a crew of four to five people. However, the officials did not indicate how many people were inside each plane. The other aircraft, a fighter plane designated P-63 Kingcobra, only has enough for one pilot. According to him, the aircraft are flown by volunteers who have received extensive training and are typically retired pilots.

According to John Cox, a former airline captain with more than 50 years of experience, air shows are required to acquire special waivers from the FAA, and all of the pilots performing the performance are required to demonstrate their proficiency in low flying as well as other maneuvers utilized in air shows. Cox is also the founder of the company that is now known as Safety Operating Systems. This company assists corporate flight services and smaller airlines all over the world with their safety planning.

According to Cox, the “air boss” of each air show acts as the event’s flight controller and is responsible for the show’s overall operation.

“The air boss is the one who makes those calls, and the pilots comply with that,” he added. “If there are any modifications that need to be done, it’s the air boss who makes those calls.” In addition, he explained that any pilot who experienced a mechanical issue was required to report it to the air boss.

According to Cox, air shows often rely on exceedingly comprehensive planning that also include alternate strategies in case of unexpected complications. For instance, any pilot who ran into problems may break out of formation and proceed to a predetermined region that was clear of other planes and was distinguished by some kind of landmark.

The B-17 is a massive four-engine bomber that was utilized in daytime attacks against Germany during World War II. It was a cornerstone of American air power throughout that conflict. During the conflict, the Soviet Union made extensive use of the American fighter plane known as the Kingcobra. According to Boeing, the majority of B-17s were destroyed at the conclusion of World War II, and there are only a few still in existence today. These B-17s are primarily displayed at museums and air events.

A number of videos that were uploaded to social media showed the bomber and the fighter plane colliding in midair, which resulted in the bomber and the fighter plane crashing to the ground with a tremendous amount of fire and smoke.

During its more than 60-year history, the Commemorative Air Force has been involved in a number of accidents, one of which was a fatal crash in 1995 near Odessa, Texas, that involved a B-26 bomber and resulted in the deaths of five crew members, according to a report by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). During preparations for an air display, the plane went down in flames. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) came to the conclusion that the probable cause of the crash that occurred in 1995 was the pilot’s inability to keep the required minimum airspeed throughout the trip.

In 2001, three persons were killed in two different plane crashes that occurred in West Texas. One of the crashes occurred in April, while the other two crashes occurred in May. When a single-engine plane that was owned by the group went down near Williamson, Georgia, in June of 2005, it resulted in the deaths of two people.

The Commemorative Air Force, formerly known as the Confederate Air Force until its members changed its name in 2001 to avoid any association with the Civil War, had its headquarters in Midland, Texas, until moving to Dallas in 2014. Prior to that, the Commemorative Air Force was known as the Confederate Air Force.

A website that promotes the event calls Wings Over Dallas “America’s Premier World War II Airshow.” This is according to the content of the website. More than forty aircraft from World War II were going to be on display during the event, which was going to take place over the Veterans Day weekend (November 11-13). The “bomber parade” and the “fighter escorts,” which featured the B-17 and the P-63, were scheduled to take place during the flying demonstrations that took place on Saturday afternoon.

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